To some, the Hawker Hurricane is the historical underdog to the more legendary Spitfire.  But, as an educational tool of science and history, it brilliantly demonstrates a cross section of aircraft timelines from WWI to WWII.

Using our third scale replica, we can demonstrate traditional construction techniques, including wooden formers and stringers, doped Irish linen covering, all metal stress skin duralumin wings, and the development of aero-engine technology, which culminated in the development of the legendary inline Merlin engine.

The Hawker Hurricane served all over the world during WWII, in more combat theatres than any other aircraft.  It shot down more aircraft than any other allied fighter and indeed all other British aircraft combined.

It’s an example of a machine that did the job, no matter what that job was, or where.  It was a global fighter, from being catapulted off merchantman ships in the Atlantic Ocean to the icy battlegrounds of the Russian front.  Its sturdy design, ease of repair and adaptability of armaments saw Hurricanes used in France, Norway, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Far East.

Personally, I love it.  Rough, tough, rugged, and beautiful.  What’s not to like?!

 

 

WHY A LARGE MODEL?

As an educator, there is nothing better that being able to deliver a session which finishes with the audience and the organisers saying, “Wow! That was brilliant.”  I believe education should have a “Wow” factor, something to talk about when you get home.

This model of the Hawker Hurricane is an evolution of work I’ve done in the past, with a B-29 Superfortress and a DH9 bomber from WWI.  Audiences loved building them.  They appreciated the workmanship and the craft that went into the making of such fantastic aircraft, both real and replica.  The modular construction technique allows a wide range of presentations that can be made appropriate for any audience type.  In particular, I am passionate about encouraging people to consider STEM related careers.  I believe that the physical involvement and attachment to this model by the audience makes it the perfect learning tool.

This time-lapse video was made during the building of the B-29 Superfortress at IWM Duxford.